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Order Zerit with No Prescription, Park Bench, Queenstown, New Zealand © Emily Shur 2008

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The biggest obstacle I think I continually face is that my work is not, order Zerit online c.o.d, Buy Zerit from canada, has never been, and might never be project oriented, purchase Zerit. Comprar en línea Zerit, comprar Zerit baratos,  I have such a hard time with the "project".  Other people do it so well, japan, craiglist, ebay, overseas, paypal, Order Zerit from mexican pharmacy, and I just can't seem to express myself in that way. Order Zerit with No Prescription,  Why can't we just take pictures.  I always feel as though there's supposed to be some deeper meaning behind my pictures, buy Zerit online no prescription, Rx free Zerit, a meaning other than "Something inside me connected with what I saw in front of me, so I pulled out my camera and took a picture."  That does not seem to fly as an artist statement, canada, mexico, india. Zerit samples,  Why, I'm not sure.

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15 comments to Order Zerit With No Prescription

  • nina

    well Mr. Eggelston works the same way you do, and he did pretty well I would say ;)
    Projects are hard.
    This made me think of you:
    http://www.visitcenter.org/programs.cfm?p=SingularImage

  • Mike S.

    Emily, I’ve found your crib via Andrew Hetherington’s blog. I love your work, I do. Wish I had a website to show you (this being show and tell) but it’s a complete fookin’ wreck at present. Another item languishing on the to-do list.

    Feel you pain vis a vis projects. It’s always felt like something I “should” be doing, but it just doesn’t come naturally. I share your high regard for Avedon’s American West work, but doubt I have the attention span for something like that. My work tends to be vignettes that I happen upon in the course of observing the ongoing freak show that is the world around us.

    I’m currently tearing out my hair over my episodic want of inspiration; and some helpful sort chimes in with “you need a project.” Grrrr. What I’d really like is five consecutive days of sunshine and a steady supply of C-41 bleach….

    I look forward to following your exploits and your work.

  • jackie

    Emily,

    It is so refreshing to read something that so accurately reflects the way I feel about project themed work. On many occasions I have lamented about the very same thing. When I am taking a photo it’s about the present moment. The NOW. To find project themes means I have to go back and think about the past.

  • Terence Patrick

    Do you ever get asked why you don’t shoot in project format from your agent or any of your clients? Would in-depth projects revolutionize and improve your portfolio, or simply just change the way you do things? The way I see it, if there’s something you’re dying to say with photographs, you’ll probably find a way to say it.

    I seem to recall your “Fresh” spread in Comm Arts a few years back and it had some personal work like a guy biting nunchucks or wearing boxing headgear? (I hope that was your work!) Was that something you wanted to say at the time?

  • Cindy

    A project doesn’t have to fit into the rigid mold you have outlined, but it is important to explore what connects you to certain scenes.

    As an artist you are required to talk about your work and connect it to a personal or broader cultural context. Why wouldn’t you want to explore your own motivations?

  • robert

    don’t know if blogger will let me post links:

    http://www.robertwrightphoto.com/writing/?p=38

    http://www.robertwrightphoto.com/writing/?p=141

    I think the only solution is to do both, work the way you work, because that is not going to change, but also try to have a parallel discussion with yourself about what is underneath the work. Then try to formalize that in words. The best outcome is when your words reinforce in your own mind what it is you are doing in the pictures.

  • craig washburn

    I feel the same way about my work. Lots of my series start off as coming across something I connected with, and then going off on a tangent.

    I don’t think of them as “accidents” so much as “recognized opportunities” :)

  • shawn rocco

    Thank you for your confession. I wish artist statements could be that brief and state the real truth. Seems a lot are made up of ideals and points of view which read as forced and contrite and therefore detracting to the work at hand, if at all relevant.

    Just the other day I was asked if I was focusing on any single issues or themes with a documentary style (not so much a project though it could be seen as one) that I’ve been exploring for the past year and a half. It’s an appropriate question.

    My answer was that when I set out on my journey I didn’t purposefully focus on any single issue, besides my issue… my attempt… to get back to a state of creativity that’s been (for lack of a better word) subjugated by the trappings of working in my profession; photojournalism for a daily newspaper.

    But as the “collection” grows certain themes have become clearer. Which is exactly what I was hoping for…. to have my photography teach me something about myself which at some point I had forgotten… or possibly really never knew.

    Hmmmm…. how’s that for a theme.
    best -shawn

  • Michael George

    I think about this every day when I’m in a class and you can tell when someone is put on the spot, has no idea what “deeper meaning” rests beyond their photograph, and is forced to BS.

    I think you worded this perfectly.

  • tony Fouhse

    wanna do a project?

    two words: road trip.

    keepkool.

    tony

  • Eric

    The idea to set out upon a certain project has always been the core of what photography is. I believe it is all in the definition of your guidelines. The scope and intent sometimes does not come until much later in the project.
    So, there seems to me a chance that all the work you are doing is your project, not just the subsets your mind creates during the creation of your path in photography.
    Looking at your work years ago I choose to start collecting your photos in a folder along with all the other shooters whose work I have admired for twenty years. That project has progressed to four file cabinets of fond creations of others and an example of how projects don’t always start with an end.
    Thanks for all the photos you’ve shared in your life project so far!
    Eric

  • Walter Dufresne

    Two helpful tricks I’ve noticed: projects get photographers out the door and working (Stephen Shore), and projects emerge from reviewing the massive amounts of work produced after getting out the door and working (Lee Friedlander).

  • Doktor

    projects – at some point everybody was doing projects – 10 years ago nobody didn’t – now it doesnt even mean anythign anymore. At some point it danwed on everybody that you can sell it better when you call it a project. To me its really a commercial term.

    The whole project thing works perfectyl as a tool – to sell a name or a work and that especially applys to art photographers like Taryn Simon and Richard Misrach (people who have their foot firmly in advertising or fashion don’t need projects to sell themselves frankly). And especially photogapher who aim to have success with their “personal” view in the commercial world AND want to have an exhibition or book once in a while jump on that bandwagon. To me this has the effect that I am kind of pissed of by the word “project” I rather look at the commercial section -sometimes THAT feels more original.

    On the other hand its very difficult to shot like a guy like Eggleston. He is a singular figure (well theres a few more like Shore , but he is also a professeur) . You basically have a few guys who do soemthing what 1000s of others woudl liek to do. So that’s no role model either. Maybe you just have to find another name then the dreaded “project”. What about the old and honest “work”. I miss the times when everybody was just doing their work what happende to that?

  • NCavillones

    Came here from a tweet that linked this post. The tweet made an analogy between photo projects and expressing cohesive ideas in writing. Your last sentence, about editing, is so true and the analogy I would make is this: that novels are to short stories, what projects are to POV photography. Both mediums serve a purpose and choosing one over the other is just a matter of style… there are plenty of short story writers that would deign to write full novels.

  • redsonika

    Found this post randomly… this is a wonderful post that embodies a lot of my own frustrations with regards to artist’s statements. Anyhow, reading it really helped me coalesce a lot of things that I’ve been thinking about how I go about photography. So much so that I ended up writing my own blog post! Ha!

    http://redsonika.wordpress.com/2009/03/20/the-random-photography-manifesto/

    Anyhow, this is a really fantastic post and I’m quite glad I found your blog, however it was I stumbled upon it!

    Peace,
    Sonja