Me Me Me Me Me Me Meeeeeeeee.


My lovely friend Nina has posted a conversation between her and I on the Nymphoto blog.  For those of you who don’t know what Nymphoto is, here is some background.:

Nymphoto is a collective of women in photography dedicated to creating a community of and for female artists & art administrators, in order to span the gender divide that pervades throughout the art world today. Our primary concern is to increase the exposure of our & other female photographers and the work they create. The collective is a fusion of industries: the scholastic, the representative and the museum.

Please check out the interview.  I am very thankful to Nina for giving me a voice in this arena.  I also think this is a good time to bring up what it means to be a woman in the photo industry.  I am not a militant feminist.  I think that’s pretty obvious.  I do think I would be remiss in saying that there are no differences between men and women photographers.  That  everything is fair and equal, and us chicks face absolutely no obstacles unique to us.  I started shooting professionally when I was about 23 years old, and I got a lot of work shooting hip-hop.  I’m no beauty queen, but I think that men react differently when a 23 year old girl walks into a studio rather than a 40 year old man.  I had to learn how to emit a professional and in-control vibe.  I learned how to be likable without being perceived as ditzy.  I think this is important for all young women out there who are going to be shooting people or just dealing with people day in and day out.  Ultimately, a subject wants their photographer to be smart and appear to know what they’re doing.  So, walking into a room to shoot a rapper when you’re 23 was actually quite good practice in learning how I want to come across on set.  It might not sound that intimidating, but it kinda was.  Hip-hop, in general, is not the kindest genre to women so it’s tough to roll in somewhere already having an idea of what your subject is thinking of you.

Then there is the “Hillary Clinton problem” of coming off like a hardened meanie when you’re really just trying to compete on the same playing field as men.  I’ve met some female photographers that I think have succumbed to this unfortunate phenomenon.  I guess it comes down to whatever works for you and yours.  I just don’t want to have to live my life that aggressively.  Is that the only way for women to get ahead?  I have no idea, but I hope not.  I am very pro-girl and think us ladies need all the help we can get, especially from each other.

Thank you again, Nina.  You’re doing something important.

3 comments to Me Me Me Me Me Me Meeeeeeeee.

  • nina

    Eloquently put! And right on. And thanks for the shout-out!

  • Terence Patrick

    I’ve assisted for quite a few female photographers and the way they orchestrate things on set always seem to impress me. It’s a good learning experience observing how female photographers direct female (or even male) subjects.

  • Terence Patrick

    BTW, thanks for the mention! :P